Category: Non-Residential Construction

CASE Beefs up D Series with new CX490D and CX500D Excavators

CASE Construction Equipment has introduced two new crawler excavators to its D Series lineup: the CX490D and CX500D. These new models are designed for heavy excavation work and replace the company’s previous 47-metric ton excavator the CX470C. Each model is built to provide significant operational gains, including cycle times up to 10 percent faster, improved responsiveness and multifunctional controls, and greater fuel efficiency. An electronically controlled hydraulic pump and larger control and solenoid valves boost breakout forces, increase lifting strength and improve responsiveness.

D Series models offer more standard features than previous CASE excavators, simplifying the buying process and making them extremely versatile and operator friendly. All CASE D Series excavators provide peace of mind and lower total cost of ownership through CASE ProCare™.

CASE Long Reach Excavators Add Increased Digging Capabilities to D Series Lineup

CASE Construction Equipment’s CX210D LR and CX250D LR crawler excavators provide increased operating performance for deep trenching, sloping, demolition, dredging, digging in sand or gravel pits or any application that requires long-distance bucket reach and precision. Each Long Reach (LR) model features an elongated boom and arm for increased digging capabilities in deep or long-distance digging applications, while providing the same improved responsiveness and multifunction controls of the D Series.

Each model also offers more standard features than previous CASE excavators, simplifying the buying process and making them extremely versatile and operator friendly. All CASE D Series excavators provide peace of mind and lower total cost of ownership through CASE ProCare™.

CASE 1021F Carries Heavy Load at Granite Pit for Largest Chip Seal Contractor in Wisconsin

Scott Construction Inc., Lake Delton, Wis., is one of Wisconsin’s leading asphalt surfacing companies, and the largest chip seal contractor in the state. To support the amount of chip seal work the company performs throughout Wisconsin and Minnesota (regional suppliers couldn’t keep up with the demand), the company began mining granite out of the new Pine Valley Quarry (Neillsville, Wis.) in 2015.

With the new quarry, Scott Construction can control quality and access to its chip seal products. The company shoots raw granite and crushes it down down to 5/8-inch minus, and then screens it and crushes it down again to ½-inch minus. The company then washes that and crushes it down to 3/8-inch and ¼-inch minus product. The remaining byproduct is then used for hot mix and concrete.

Focus on Cycle Times Pushes Mass Excavation Success for Rafat

Rafat General Contracting (Bolton, Ontario, Canada) has been in business since 1988. The company has grown since then to more than 400 employees and 200 pieces of equipment that handle everything from excavation and demolition to site remediation and property management.

One of the latest projects for Rafat is the mass excavation of a site for the construction of a new retirement facility in the greater Toronto area.

CASE, Miller-Bradford & Risberg, and Paladin Attachments Assist Team Rubicon in Heavy Equipment Operator Training; Building Demolition at Patriot Exercise 2016

CASE Construction Equipment and Miller-Bradford & Risberg provided equipment and product/training support to Team Rubicon as part of Patriot Exercise 2016, a full-scale training exercise at Volk Field Air National Guard Base July 16 – 23, 2016. Team Rubicon provided Incident Management Team support, as well as field-based response support through damage assessments, and chainsaw and heavy equipment operations/training.

Miller-Bradford and CASE provided skid steers, excavators and compact excavators, as well as training support, while Paladin Attachments supplied skid steer grapple buckets, for Team Rubicon’s heavy equipment training program. A total of 89 Team Rubicon members participated in the event with 15 of those participating in the heavy equipment program. Training focused on the safe operation and maintenance of equipment, followed by operator proficiency training involving clearing brush and debris, and building demolition – core elements of Team Rubicon’s disaster response work.

New Excavator Proves to be Jack-of-all-Trades for North Carolina Contractor

Headquartered in Archdale, North Carolina, Ace/Avant Concrete Construction Company, Inc. has been in the concrete business for more than 25 years. What began as a small enterprise pouring concrete slabs and footings has now grown into a large and successful company with more than 250 skilled employees, offering their clients a complete range of site work and concrete construction services.

The company has constructed more than 280 million square-feet of industrial floors and tilt-up wall panels in more than 20 states since 1990.

Ten Tips for Buying a New Excavator

When it comes to purchasing a new excavator, there are many important items to consider. Understanding the right specs and knowing what to look for will have the greatest impact on the productivity of your business. Here is a list of ten important considerations for buying a new excavator.

1. Operating weight/size, Application
It’s important to match the right size machine to the tasks at hand. Crawler excavators are generally grouped into three size-classes; compact/mini (0 – 6 metric tons; or <13,227 pounds), mid-size (6 – 10 metric tons; or 13,227 – 22,046 pounds) and standard/full-size (10 – 90 metric tons; or 22,046 – 198,416 pounds).

The Art of Equipment Fuel Efficiency

Diesel costs are one of the heaviest line items in a contractor’s budget. Smart equipment use, maintenance and selection, however, can significantly reduce the amount of diesel fuel burned each day. This helps extend runtimes (greater productivity/less time refueling and acquiring fuel), reduce total operating costs and, ultimately, be more competitive when bidding jobs.

In this article, we’ll cover a few core principles that affect fuel efficiency throughout the life of a machine and how to get the most out of each gallon.

Lowering Wheel Loader TCO

When trying to manage the total cost of ownership of your wheel loader, there are several things you can do that will give you an edge on your bottom line—and your competition. Here are ten considerations that can help you lower your operating and ownership costs and increase your profitability.

  1. Right-sizing Equipment. Maybe more so than any other piece of heavy equipment, the size of the loader—and the bucket—can have a heavy impact on upstream and downstream operations. Production in an aggregate or concrete mixing plant can be reduced if a loader bucket isn’t large enough to keep the hopper full. Similarly, in a mass earthmoving application, if a wheel loader can’t keep up with the dozers pushing material to it, then those dozers will be forced to wait.It’s also important to remember that bigger isn’t always better. A wheel loader or bucket can be too large, depending on the application. An oversized machine may have to sit idle waiting to refill a hopper, or waiting for more material. Be sure to work with your CASE dealer and choose the right-sized machine for your application.
  2. Know Your Engine. Today’s Tier 4 Final wheel loaders are equipped with a variety of engine types and after-treatment technologies, and knowing the differences, as well as the impact that they can have on your operation, is essential in managing your ownership costs.CASE has adopted Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for use in its F Series wheel loaders. SCR lowers harmful emissions through a simple chemical reaction by introducing Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) into the exhaust stream. These systems do not require any kind of regeneration, filter replacement or other maintenance practices found in other systems. SCR allows the engine to run at peak performance, which provides faster throttle response while also maintaining lower temperatures and delivering up to 20% better fuel efficiency over other solutions. It also helps the engine run at lower temperatures, which ultimately extends the service life of components that surround the engine as they are not subject to as much heat stress.It’s important to understand how your after-treatment system works, and how it can impact your productivity in different applications. For example, long warm-up periods in the cold months, as well as any excessive idle times can have a negative impact on the efficiency of SCR-equipped engines. Besides the obvious fuel costs associated with long idle times, this practice also makes SCR systems run less efficiently. Operators will experience higher DEF dosing rates and more frequent fill-ups, so we always suggest using the auto-idle or shutdown features to limit idle times and improve engine efficiency—this will lower your fuel and DEF costs over the life of the machine.
  3. Matching Axles to Operation 
    Pairing the wrong axle/tire configuration to a specific wheel loader application can cause increased wear to the tires, and can put the axles under unnecessarily excessive load.  Properly managing this lowers costs over time and prevents potential long-term damage to the axles.CASE offers three axle options designed to meet the unique requirements of nearly all applications—limited-slip, differential lock and open axle.Limited-slip
    CASE offers a standard limited-slip axle—both front and rear—on our 521F, 621F, 721F, and 821F wheel loaders.

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