Category: Waste/Scrap

CASE Introduces CX290D Material Handler and CX290D Scrap Loader for Waste and Scrap Applications

CASE Construction Equipment has introduced two all-new crawler excavators to its D Series lineup: the CX290D material handler and CX290D scrap loader. With an operating weight of 72,100 pounds and lift capacities of up to 24,650 pounds, each purpose-built model is designed specifically for use with grapples, magnets, shears and other attachments used in the scrap and waste industries, and offers several key features that fine-tune the machines for material handling and scrap loading applications.

The CX290D material handler features a 177 HP Tier 4 Final engine, a hydraulically controlled elevating cab, longer arm and boom with optimized hydraulic circuits for improved attachment performance and reduced shock in the cab, as well as an electronic sensor-driven anti-interference device that automatically prevents the grapple or other attachments from coming into contact with the machine’s structure during operation. The CX290D also features additional guarding on the cab and undercarriage designed to protect the operator and machine during tough waste and scrap handling applications. The scrap loader version features a goose-neck arm and a straight boom configuration for dedicated scrap loading applications.

CASE Launches Dynamic Total Cost of Ownership Calculator

CASE Construction Equipment has launched an all-new Total Cost of Ownership Calculator at CaseCE.com that provides both prospective buyers and current equipment owners insight into lifetime ownership costs. Based on a broad range of operational factors covering the entire line of CASE equipment, the program calculates data in U.S. and Canadian currencies, as well as metric and imperial measurements.

The calculator – available at tco.CaseCE.com – is free to use and is applicable in the U.S. and Canada.

Tips for Staying Ahead of the Competition on Estimating and Bidding Earthmoving Projects

No two earthmoving jobs are alike. The gained wisdom of you and your colleagues, the technological advances in today’s equipment, and your confidence in your workforce can all help you properly bid and secure new work. It’s a tricky process – how do you come in low enough to win the bid but also high enough to ensure profitability in the job? We all love what we do, but let’s not kid ourselves – we’re in this to make money.

What follows are a few tips that I’ve picked up in more than 30 years of working as a contractor and a few years now working as a product promotions specialist with CASE, where I work with contractors from all over the world at the world class Tomahawk Customer Center. It may be as simple as moving dirt, but it’s the attention to detail that will keep you ahead of the competition.

Managing Planned Maintenance Contracts with Telematics Systems

One of the best ways to ensure overall health, productivity and reliability of a machine—either new or used—throughout the course of its lifetime is through investing in a planned maintenance contract. These contracts allow an equipment owner to opt for agreed-to servicing with manufacturer-approved parts, fluids and components, at agreed-to intervals. A planned maintenance contract also provides peace of mind for the owner and/or fleet manager—it’s simply one less thing to worry about.

Equipment owners want to protect their investments, minimize total cost of ownership and make sure that they are getting all they can out of a machine. Proper servicing at regular intervals—particularly when a machine is brand new—improves its life expectancy, and ensures that a machine is going to perform reliably throughout the course of its lifetime.

Ten Tips for Buying a New Excavator

When it comes to purchasing a new excavator, there are many important items to consider. Understanding the right specs and knowing what to look for will have the greatest impact on the productivity of your business. Here is a list of ten important considerations for buying a new excavator.

1. Operating weight/size, Application
It’s important to match the right size machine to the tasks at hand. Crawler excavators are generally grouped into three size-classes; compact/mini (0 – 6 metric tons; or <13,227 pounds), mid-size (6 – 10 metric tons; or 13,227 – 22,046 pounds) and standard/full-size (10 – 90 metric tons; or 22,046 – 198,416 pounds).

The Art of Equipment Fuel Efficiency

Diesel costs are one of the heaviest line items in a contractor’s budget. Smart equipment use, maintenance and selection, however, can significantly reduce the amount of diesel fuel burned each day. This helps extend runtimes (greater productivity/less time refueling and acquiring fuel), reduce total operating costs and, ultimately, be more competitive when bidding jobs.

In this article, we’ll cover a few core principles that affect fuel efficiency throughout the life of a machine and how to get the most out of each gallon.

Lowering Wheel Loader TCO

When trying to manage the total cost of ownership of your wheel loader, there are several things you can do that will give you an edge on your bottom line—and your competition. Here are ten considerations that can help you lower your operating and ownership costs and increase your profitability.

Right-sizing Equipment.
Maybe more so than any other piece of heavy equipment, the size of the loader—and the bucket—can have a heavy impact on upstream and downstream operations. Production in an aggregate or concrete mixing plant can be reduced if a loader bucket isn’t large enough to keep the hopper full. Similarly, in a mass earthmoving application, if a wheel loader can’t keep up with the dozers pushing material to it, then those dozers will be forced to wait.It’s also important to remember that bigger isn’t always better. A wheel loader or bucket can be too large, depending on the application. An oversized machine may have to sit idle waiting to refill a hopper, or waiting for more material. Be sure to work with your CASE dealer and choose the right-sized machine for your application.

End-of-Year Equipment Considerations

Work may slow down this time of year for contractors in northern climates, while others transition to seasonal work that keeps them busy throughout the winter. And if the ground isn’t frozen and the weather holds out, construction season is a year-round event.  

Regardless of climate, the end of the year and the holidays bring on a time of reflection and opportunity. Here are six tips and thoughts for contractors as they take stock of their equipment fleet going into 2016.

A Primer in Hydraulic Systems Maintenance

Whether you’re working with motor graders, skid steers, track loaders, backhoes or excavators, the one thing that each of these machines has in common is a hydraulic system. From a maintenance perspective, hydraulic systems are often one of the most overlooked components of a machine, yet they are arguably the most important when it comes to getting the best performance out of a piece of equipment. As best practices suggest, most operators will do a daily walkaround inspection, and as long as there are no leaks and the oil level is good, that’s the end of it. But if you want to protect your investment and keep your equipment performing at its best, a hydraulic system requires much more than that. In this article, we will focus on three key elements of any hydraulic system — oil, filtration and system integrity.

Oil
The mantra today is lowering operating costs. Some contractors will take this concept the wrong way and use the cheapest hydraulic oil in order to keep costs down—this can save a few bucks in the short term, but can cause serious harm to your hydraulic system over time. Will you see a failure right away? No, but using the right kind of hydraulic oil can be the difference between an axial piston pump (a very expensive component) lasting 10,000 hours instead of 5,000 hours.

Winter is Coming: How to Properly Prepare Equipment for Winter

With the winter months quickly approaching, contractors and business owners have to start thinking about preparing their equipment for harsh winter weather conditions.

Whether working in the freezing temperatures or storing equipment for the season, companies need to ensure proper winter maintenance to avoid costly problems come spring.

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