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Dozer Undercarriage Health and Maintenance Drives Total Machine Performance

As featured in Aggregates Manager. Fact: approximately 20 percent of the purchase price and 50 percent of the maintenance cost of a dozer sits in its undercarriage. That’s a lot of money tied to one component. Of all tracked machines, a dozer undercarriage experiences more force, abrasion and resistance than any other piece of equipment. Keeping that undercarriage in good working order will go a long way towards reducing maintenance costs and optimizing your working hours. In this article we will cover tips on how to prevent and minimize undercarriage wear, maximize undercarriage life and lower owning and operating costs.

We’ll follow that up with The Dozer Health Checklist. As with all equipment, it’s often the small stuff that can trip you up. Daily maintenance and upkeep is critical to overall machine health. Follow these important steps to ensure overall machine health – and see how new technologies can help you keep track of your service demands.  

The Art of the Compact Track Loader

Compact Track Loaders (CTL) provides three significant advantages: lower ground pressure for operating over terrain where utilities and other systems may sit just below the surface, the ability to minimize impact on finished surfaces (less rutting) and the ability to provide greater stability/flotation. While CTLs and skid steer loaders are often discussed interchangeably, they are different machines with different strengths and different challenges. Using CTLs in the appropriate applications, with the most suitable attachments and a proper understanding of the undercarriage, will help owners and operators master the art of the CTL.

The Advantages of Tracks
Generally speaking: applications that require lifting and articulating of a load on a soft or uneven surface may be best performed with CTLs. While CTLs can be used on asphalt, concrete and other improved surfaces, it’s not recommended. These surfaces shorten the overall lifespan of the tracks as they cause more abrasion and wear. CTLs are best suited for softer surfaces (grasses, dirt, gravel) and provide greater flotation and stability on uneven surfaces – a particular strength for slope work. The ability to operate on grass and other unpaved surfaces without creating ruts is important because it reduces cleanup time and site repair costs.

Interprovincial Security and Recovery: Telematics and Equipment Security

Snow is serious business in the Northern U.S. and Canada – and the winter of 2013/2014 kept snow removal contractors busy. The hours are long and unpredictable, not to mention cold and wet. With all these variables, the last thing anyone wants to worry about is losing a machine, for any reason, be it downtime or theft.

Donald Kemp, of Donald Kemp and Sons, is a licensed snow removal contractor in Ottawa, where they receive more than seven feet of snow annually. Kemp had been relying on a CASE 580 Super N backhoe as one of the primary methods of loading trucks to haul snow out of parking lots.   

Value of Remote Monitoring for Equipment Maintenance

While contractors choose to use telematics for different reasons, many appreciate the value it delivers in the form of remote monitoring for equipment maintenance – and with good reason: It streamlines the care and service of equipment, while saving time and money in the process. Here’s a refresher on telematics and how it can take maintenance programs to the next level.

Informed decision-making pays dividends
Telematics is a web-based technology that uses a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver and an onboard communication device on each machine. The GPS receiver identifies the machine location, while the modem collects information sent to it by sensors on the machine. The data is then transmitted through the modem to designated users via a Web portal.

It Takes a Village: Slinger, Wis. Looks for Power and Versatility as it Deploys a New Skid Steer

Municipal work is a blending of different trades. Equipment needs to be equally versatile. It was with this eye on versatility that the Village of Slinger, Wis., added a new skid steer to its fleet: the Tier 4 Final SR210 from CASE Construction Equipment.

“Being a smaller town and cross training as much as we do, it’s very important that all our equipment is flexible so that we can be as efficient as possible,” says Greg Moser, DPW and utilities superintendent, Village of Slinger.

CASE 885B AWD Motor Grader Proves Its Mettle in Big Sky Country

As Road Supervisor for Toole County, Mont., Lloyd Omdahl understands the importance of power and versatility in his equipment. With nearly 2,000 square miles of land—about the size of Delaware—and just over 5,200 residents, it’s a county that needs to make the most of its equipment purchases.

When the county needed a new Motor Grader last year, Omdahl decided to give the CASE 885B AWD (all wheel drive) a try.

A Detroit Success Story: New CASE 1150M Dozer Tears Through Frost; Improves Operator Control

Over the past 40 years, the Walker family has learned a thing or two about adaptability and durability. Being able to adjust to the often-tumultuous Detroit-area economy and transform their business to include everything from demolition to finish work has given them the adaptability they’ve needed to survive.

When it came time to add a new dozer to their fleet, they were prepared to go with the same brand they had for the past 35 years. That long history of devotion was overturned, however, when they purchased the new 1150M dozer from CASE Construction Equipment.

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